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CARRIÈS, Jean

Lyon, Rhône 1855 - Paris 1894

L'Homme aux grelots dit Le bouffon désespéré

The Man with Bells, called The Forlorn Jester

1892

glazed stoneware

head

Dimensions (HxWxD): 12 716 x 14 58 x 12 in.

Acc. No.: 2014.59

Credit Line: Achat en mémoire de Patrice Bellanger, fonds de la Campagne du Musée 1988-1993 / Purchase in memory of Patrice Bellanger, the Museum Campaign 1988-1993 Fund

Photo credit: photo MBAM/MMFA

© Artist : public domain


Provenance

  • 2014, Purchase in memory of Patrice Bellanger, the Museum Campaign 1988-1993 Fund

Bibliography

  • Museum's website (accessed March 5, 2019)

Comment

  • Museum's website (accessed March 5, 2019):
    Preferring the street to the Academy, Carriès drew inspiration from the “Court of Miracles” or slum neighbourhood that was home to his first ramshackle studio, as well as from literature – the romanticism of Hugo’s Gothic beggars and the naturalism of Zola’s characters, shut out of the modern world. Influenced by the Symbolists, Carriès was haunted by the image of the severed head, evocative of the sacrifice of martyrs such as Saint John the Baptist. The figures of the acrobat, the jester, the Harlequin, the Pierrot or the clown generate a double meaning in keeping with a mood of doleful irony. After his discovery of Japanese stoneware at the Exposition Universelle of 1878, Carriès developed a passion for the “virile porcelain,” which was as hard as stone. This pioneer represented a symbiosis of artist and artisan, the ideal of the new modernity.