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10908_AC_1958-19

RODIN, Auguste

Paris 1840 - Meudon, Hauts-de-Seine 1917

L'Homme au nez cassé, masque avec amorce de poitrine et piédouche carré fondu en même temps, dit type I, 3e modèle

Man with the Broken Nose, Mask with upper chest and square pedestal cast at the same time, known as Type I, third model

modeled 1863-1864, Type I, third model before 1885

bronze ; sand cast [archives, Musée Rodin, Paris]

head

Dimensions (HxWxD): 12 34 x 7 38 x 6 12 in.

Acc. No.: AC 1958.19

Credit Line: Purchased

Photo credit: ph. Collections Database, Five Colleges and Historic Deerfield Museum Consortium, museums.fivecolleges.edu

© Artist:


Provenance

  • 1958, Purchased

Bibliography

  • Collections Database, Five Colleges and Historic Deerfield Museum Consortium (accessed February 14, 2017)
  • 2007 Le Normand-Romain (français)
    Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, avec la collaboration d'Hélène Marraud et Diane Tytgat, introductions par Dr. Ruth Butler et Mr. Régis Cusinberche, Rodin et le bronze. Catalogue des œuvres conservées au musée Rodin, 2 volumes, Paris, Musée Rodin / Editions de la Réunion des musées nationaux, 2007, vol. 2, pp.413-419, L'homme au nez cassé, masque avec amorce de poitrine et piédouche carré fondu en même temps, dit type I, 3e modèle, 1863-1864, cet exemplaire est cité p. 415: "sans marque de fondeur : Amherst, Mass., Mead Art Building (bronze "vert", coll. Gustave Biot, Bruxelles, avant 1885)"
  • 2007 Le Normand-Romain (English)
    Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, with the collaboration of Hélène Marraud and Diane Tytgat, introductions by Dr. Ruth Butler and Mr. Régis Cusinberche, The Bronzes of Rodin. Catalogue of works in the Musée Rodin, 2 volumes, English version, Paris, Musée Rodin / Editions de la Réunion des musées nationaux, 2007, vol. 2, pp.413-419, The Man with the Broken Nose, Mask with upper chest and square pedestal cast at the same time, known as Type I, third model, 1863-1864, this copy is mentioned p. 415: "no foundry mark: Amherst (Mass.), Amherst College, Mead Art Museum ("green" bronze, Gustave Biot Coll., Brussels, before 1885)"

Comment

  • Museum's website (February 16, 2017):
    In Man with the Broken Nose Rodin aimed at capturing the specific traits of an elderly worker from Paris named Bibi, while at the same time showing human features that transcend the individual. “This mask,” Rodin declared in 1889, “determined all my future work. . . . I have never succeeded in making a figure as good as the Broken Nose.”
    When Rodin was working on the plaster model, it froze in winter and the back of the head cracked off. Nevertheless, the artist decided to submit the remaining “mask” to the Salon of 1865, where it was rejected. He created numerous versions of the head in the following years, and they enjoyed great success.
    The play of light and shadow on the uneven surface breathes life into Rodin’s sculptures. It seems almost as if the artist’s hands were still there, kneading and modeling the material. This quality gives them a strong physical and psychological presence.